It’s officially a new year, and many of us are looking for ways to become healthier in 2020 – that’s great!

There are endless articles and blogs out there about making changes in your diet and lifestyle, many of them contradictory, which can cause confusion and frustration on what choices to make.

And the truth is, everyone has unique needs when it comes to nutrition. That means what works for your friend, co-worker or neighbor may not be what’s best for you. It’s difficult to turn off those messages and hone in on doing what is best for you, but it’s often necessary in order for us to be healthier – both mind and body.

However, there are some general guidelines when it comes to eating a balanced diet and living a balanced lifestyle, so I’ll share a few of those here:

  1. Aim to eat plenty of vegetables and fruit. They’re packed with nutrition (vitamins, minerals, fiber, antioxidants, water) and are low in calories. Yes, even fruit. Fruit does have carbohydrates and natural sugars, but it’s difficult to consume too much sugar by eating fruit. Plus, the benefits of eating fruit far outweigh the fact that they contain natural sugar. If you come across a diet or meal plan telling you not to eat mangos, bananas, peaches, kiwi, etc, then I’d likely second guess how balanced the plan is from a nutritional standpoint (same goes for starchy vegetables like butternut squash, sweet potatoes and peas). A good rule of thumb is to make half of your plate non-starchy vegetables and eat fruit as a snack and with breakfast (aim for 3+ servings of veggies and fruits daily).
  2. Get some good quality protein in with each meal and snack. Foods like seafood, poultry, lean beef and pork, eggs, beans, legumes, dairy products, tofu, tempeh, etc, all are good sources of protein. Protein is essential for so many functions in our bodies, but it also helps you stay full and satisfied. Think of eating a salad with just veggies and dressing versus eating a salad with veggies, grilled chicken, chickpeas and dressing – you’ll be a lot more satisfied with the protein and veggie-packed salad! Including protein and heart-healthy fats (like avocado, for example) can also help regulate blood sugar.
  3. Take a look at how much added sugar you consume (you can do this by journaling in an app such as MyFitnessPal). If you tend to add sugar to all of your meals and snacks or choose foods that are high in added sugar (those not naturally occurring), it may be a good idea to look at reducing it and swapping in foods that don’t have any or have very little added sugar. But also remember that it’s not necessary to go overboard with cutting out sugar – no, it isn’t good for us in large quantities, but it also isn’t healthy for us to obsess over every last gram. Remember that eating healthy is all about balance and having a good relationship with food. These muffins are the perfect example – yes, they contain added sugar (brown sugar), but they are a much healthier muffin than what you can typically buy in the grocery store or find at a bakery. They only have 11g per muffin (some naturally occurring, some added), and the traditional bakery muffin can have up to 40g of sugar. Plus, we’ve upgraded them by using oat or whole wheat flour, flax, oats, blueberries and Greek yogurt.

There are many more nutrition tips I can offer, but this is a great place to start. If you’re looking for personalized nutrition guidance, I’d highly suggest visiting The Well or seeing a registered dietitian in your area – always remember that we all have different needs when it comes to our health, and taking small steps to better health – one at a time – is much more sustainable over a long period of time.

So, let’s do this, 2020!

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Blueberry Crumble Muffins

  • Author: Julie Andrews
  • Prep Time: 10 mins
  • Cook Time: 18-22 mins
  • Total Time: 28-32 mins
  • Yield: Makes 12 muffins 1x
  • Category: Breakfast, Snack
  • Method: Baking

Scale

Ingredients

Muffins:

  • 1 ½ cups whole wheat or oat flour
  • ¼ cup ground flax seed
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ cup oil
  • ½ cup dark brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 ½ teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • ⅔ cup plain or vanilla Greek yogurt
  • 1 cup frozen or fresh blueberries

Crumble:

  • 3 tablespoons melted butter or oil
  • ½ cup quick or old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 2 tablespoons whole wheat or oat flour
  • 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a 12-cup muffin tin with muffin liners.
  2. In a bowl, stir together flour, flax, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon until combined.
  3. In a separate bowl, whisk together oil and brown sugar until fluffy. Whisk in eggs, one at a time, until well beaten. Whisk in vanilla extract and yogurt until combined.
  4. Add flour mixture to the wet ingredients and stir until just combined, then gently fold in the blueberries.
  5. Evenly spoon batter into each muffin liner, filling almost all the way to the top.
  6. In a separate small bowl, stir together the melted butter or oil, oats, flour and brown sugar until combined. Spoon a few tablespoons of the mixture on top of each muffin and lightly press down so it adheres to the muffin.
  7. Bake 18-22 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Let slightly cool before removing from the muffin tin.

Notes

Cooking Tip: Only mix the batter until just combined. Overmixing will make the muffins tough.

Snack Pairings: Pair with a hard-boiled egg or a cheese stick and a handful of carrot or celery sticks for a balanced snack.


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 muffin
  • Calories: 215
  • Sugar: 11g
  • Sodium: 86mg
  • Fat: 9g
  • Saturated Fat: 3g
  • Unsaturated Fat: 6g
  • Trans Fat: 0g
  • Carbohydrates: 30g
  • Fiber: 3g
  • Protein: 6g
  • Cholesterol: 39mg

Keywords: muffins, muffin, blueberry, blueberries, berry, berries, breakfast, snack

6 Comments

  1. Monica on January 27, 2020 at 11:45 am

    what can I substitute for the yogurt?

    • Julie Andrews on January 27, 2020 at 12:38 pm

      You could use any milk as a sub!

  2. Meena on April 20, 2020 at 1:19 pm

    what can I substitute for the eggs?

    • Julie Andrews on April 21, 2020 at 8:41 am

      Hi Meena – Bob’s Red Mill makes an egg replacer or you can make a flax egg. Whisk together 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed with 2 tablespoons of water, then let it sit in the refrigerator for 15 minutes – this makes a replacement for 1 egg.

  3. Deb on May 14, 2020 at 5:09 am

    Can plain Chobani Yogurt be used?

    • Julie Andrews on May 14, 2020 at 7:47 am

      Absolutely! Any plain or vanilla Greek yogurt will work.

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